Once again we have a good example that compares our rights and freedoms to countries where those very basic things are curtailed.

British historian David Irving was sentenced to three years in prison in Austria for challenging the extent of the Holocaust.

Certainly Irving is wrong in his challenge which denies much of the atrocity. More than six million Jews were put to death by the Adolph Hitler regime and there are volumes of photos, written accounts and personal testimony to corroborate the worst case of inhumanity known to modern man.

And there have been others who said the Holocaust was overstated or either didn’t happen at all. As well, there are still those who believe the earth is flat and that man has not walked on the moon. Don’t bother them with intelligent dialogue and greatly substantiated facts. They like to live in a world that they have created in their minds, and it’s of little use to attempt to enlighten them because enlightenment does not come down on one like a bolt of lightning, shaking one to his very roots. It must be sought and embraced.

But even though Irving is wrong in his claim, in the United States people actually have a right to be wrong. They even have a right to make fools of themselves and to seek financial gain in doing so. They have a right to write things that have absolutely no foundation as long as they are not in contrast to libel and slander laws.

Foolish opinions are not a crime in this country. We even have people who have written and spoken that the Ku Klux Klan is misunderstood and basically is a bunch of swell guys.

As ridiculous as Irving’s claims are, in the United States he has a right to be ridiculous. And that’s how it should be. And it’s important for us to make note of these differences.

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