Shouldn’t we think about things that we don’t think about? I discovered one who does. Mr. Allan Savoy, uses “Ted” on YouTube to push his agenda, which he refers to as “Holistic Grassland Management,” along with his partner and wife have written several books on the subject — even third editions.

Born on the family farm of 45,000 acres in South Africa, he grazes cattle, not less per acre but more. Cattle are the best manure producers, fertilizing while moving them daily to new areas is the secret. Controlled grazing is not a new concept in America, we’ve practiced this for years — but Mr. Savoy said, “desertification” is not taught in any university in the world, while every continent not covered in ice has need of the practice. Continuing he says, “grasslands preserve moisture that otherwise will run off arid soil without benefit.”

Our American west grazed 100 millions of buffalo that fertilized the tall prairie grasses. While today this unique grassland is used to grow multiple grains to pen feed our protein requirement.

Sally Nicholl, a South African native who admits not having any interest in climate conditions, said, “After research and being exposed to Holistic  Management, I have found an interest in climate conditions.”

Continuing, Sally says, burning one hectare of grassland gives off more pollutants than 6,000 cars, consider if fossil fuels weren’t used there are still multiple dangers to our climate conditions. Methane gas from cattle should not bother our climate with Holistic Management, there will not be an increase in cattle — but a wise usage of cattle to nurture soil and humans, with a better quality product.

Mr. Savoy points out, “One billion hectares of grasslands are burned each year — grassland that should have been grazed.”

California forest land and homes burn annually without solution — should California be viewed as a given? (We can only hope not).

I would like to see an offer made by Auburn and Univ of Ga to invite Mr. Savoy to the October Ag show in Moultrie, not so much for Holistic Management in the Southeastern U. S. — but we sure could use some Midwestern grass-fed beef in our part of the country. I believe the phrase uttered by Clarance Darrow in the Tennessee monkey trial to have some merit, to bring about change. “We should think about things that we do not think about.”

Tom Rogers

Moultrie

React to this story:

0
0
0
0
0